All posts by Dini M

Travelling yogini. Free spirit. Skipper of Happy Dancer. Mother of three angels. Ayurvedic practitioner. Yin and vinyasa yoga teacher. Acro yoga lover. Experienced doula. Sustainability dudess. Lunatic dancer. Tarot card reader. Passionate writer... I love sharing big and small steps of our journey: Living the dream. When we are not sailing the world on Happy Dancer, we stop to teach yoga, connect with local communities, dive right into a place, its peoples and cultures and bring joy and encouragement for others to live their dreams. Believing in the power of one's dreams is what drives me, and having the power to bring dreams alive is what keeps me going. Enjoy the ride and please do get in touch to share your dreams. We love likes, comments and emails - or radio us on VHF, dance with us at a festival or join one of my yoga retreats!

A sailing family weekend on Sydney Harbour


We are all one, but different

Last weekend we received our official Welcome Ceremony at the Narara Eco Village, an hour north of Sydney. A long time has passed since I have written regularly, partially due to more time spend turning inwards, partially due to lots of yoga teaching, retreats and workshops which – together with the homeschooling of my three, a sailing boat to loath and love, freelance writing commitment and, yes, believe it or not, time to meditate and dance – left my blogging tank empty.

Maitland Bay Dini Martinez Yoga

Right now, however, I’m feeling a new wave of sharing enthusiasm as the sangha, my community, whether in yoga, at the Village, amongst fellow sailors and far out into this world with you, is after all something that gives me energy and joy. As such, let me share the beautiful poem we were welcomed with at Narara as we walked through the welcoming spiral. I hope it makes your heart beat faster, just like it did with mine.

Namaste, soul greetings – Dini.

Continue reading We are all one, but different

What if we all could choose peace?


Patrea King’s memoir, Up Until Now, quote Dr Jerry Jampolsky

I can always perceive anger in myself or in others as a call for help, rather than as an attack.

She asks: Can we look past frayed tempers and harsh words rather than hurling back a defence that serves only to escalate the upset?  [Can we] choose peace rather than conflict, peace rather than being right, peace rather than a cure, peace rather than hanging on to what has become second nature to us?

She suggests that ‘the peace that passes all understanding is attainable for each of us’.

When I don’t choose peace, remind me of this dear friends.

The most stressful things about family holidays

This is a guest post for fellow family travellers;)

It’s not the easiest thing to do – a family holiday is bound to be full of complications. After all, you hardly ever all agree on anything at home. Here are some of the biggest annoyances you’re bound to run into, and how you can avoid them.




Someone’s going to want to take too much. Somebody else won’t pack enough at all. It’s not going to be plain sailing getting the family to pack efficiently – and you can guarantee that you’re going to leave something behind. Just don’t do a Home Alone! There’s a plethora of tips online to help make at least this part of the holiday easier – consider making lists for each member of the family, so that they can tick things off when they’re in the case. Just make sure you don’t forget anything important at this stage.


Choosing the right destination


When it comes to choosing a place to visit, you’ll likely once again be at loggerheads. Everybody will ideally want something different from their holiday – the kids will be imagining an energetic resort packed full of things to do, whereas parents will want something a bit more laidback. Why not have both? There’s a huge range of holiday resorts and complexes worldwide that offer something for everyone, and you’ll want to make sure everyone gets to do something they want – CTI recommends active holidays for young children and teens, so make it exciting. Consider a destination that offers plenty of opportunities to explore.


Keeping the journey fun


Depending on how long the plane/car ride is to your destination – and how young your little ones are – there’s potential for them to get bored. Nobody wants to hear “are we there yet?” two hours before you arrive. If there are no movies to watch, consider bringing books, games and perhaps even a tablet with you. There are hundreds of apps that allow you to save movies and programmes for offline watching, so the time will literally fly by.


What will you eat?


Cuisine is always an important factor when it comes to holidaying – perhaps without you even realising. Nowadays it’s more likely you’ll be able to find anything you want to eat anywhere in the world, but you can’t be sure. Before you head off on your travels, have a brush up on the local cuisine and see what’s on offer where you’re staying. There’s nothing worse than when kids (and maybe adults) don’t like anything on the menu.


Finding activities for everyone


If you’re using these tips, you’ll have already considered this factor when choosing where to go. Wherever you are, you’re going to have to split your time up so that everybody gets to do something they want to. The little ones might moan over the fact you’re going on a boat trip, but why not book to head to the local waterpark the next day? Giving yourself time to relax whilst also dedicating days to keeping the kids occupied is incredibly important for a stress-free holiday, and so perhaps create an itinerary that works for everyone before you go.

Would you live on the high-seas?

Another beautiful interview, this time with the amazing Shevonne Hunt from Kinderling Radio in Sydney. She’s found her passion and when it comes to her interviews and podcasts, you know Shevonne’s found her Dharma, her path in life, as not only her eyes, but every cell of her body sparkles. Encounters like that make me happy. Thanks Shevonne and everyone else, enjoy the short and sweet 10 minute interview.